MLPP Blog: Factually Speaking

Undocumented immigrants: Reform increases their tax contributions

Added April 20th, 2015 by Alicia Guevara Warren | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Alicia Guevara Warren

Editor’s note: The original blog post and ITEP report incorrectly stated the effective tax rate for the top 1% of earners in Michigan. We apologize for this error, which has been corrected.

Undocumented immigrants already contribute a significant amount to our state’s tax system. Under President Obama’s 2012 and 2014 executive actions, the amount will increase and could be even more with comprehensive reform.

According to a new 50-state study, “Undocumented Immigrants’ State and Local Tax Contributions” by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, the 100,000 undocumented immigrants living in Michigan contribute $86 million in state and local taxes. With the president’s executive actions, ITEP estimates that this will increase by $10.86 million when it is fully implemented to allow temporary reprieve to youth who have resided in the country for at least five years and parents of U.S. citizens or legal residents. If comprehensive reform were undertaken granting lawful permanent residence to all undocumented immigrants in Michigan, the gain would be about $26.4 million. (more…)

Maintaining cultural ties and family stability for American Indian Children

Added November 25th, 2014 by Alicia Guevara Warren | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Alicia Guevara Warren

American Indian children in Michigan are the most likely to be removed from their homes due to abuse and/or neglect: 1.5 times the rate of white children and the highest of all children of color in the state, according to the Michigan Race Equity Coalition. They are also more likely to age out of the foster care system. It is disturbing, however, that the rate of investigation for abuse and/or neglect is lower compared with white children. (more…)

Moving from mass incarceration to mass education

Added November 21st, 2014 by Judy Putnam | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Judy Putnam

Michigan needs to spend less on prisons and more on schools.

Between 1986 and 2013, Michigan’s spending on prisons jumped 147% when inflation is counted, according to research by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Meanwhile, per-pupil foundation spending in Michigan remains lower than before the Great Recession began. (more…)

Latino students face barriers to opportunity

Added October 13th, 2014 by Alicia Guevara Warren | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Alicia Guevara Warren

As Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations come to an end, we must recognize the ongoing struggles of Latino children—a growing component of Michigan’s next workforce.

A recent report revealed that over the past decade, reading and math scores for Latino students in Michigan have fallen when compared to other Latinos across the country, a direct reflection of the state’s insufficient investments in educational programs that work for all students. (more…)

League supports Michigan’s move to cleaner energy

Added September 8th, 2014 by Shannon Nobles | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Shannon Nobles

The Michigan League for Public Policy has recently added clean energy as a focus area in our policy and advocacy work.

Clean energy is an important issue for the organization, as well as our state, as Michigan looks to implement Environmental Protection Agency’s policy to reduce carbon emissions nationwide. While the state has been on the way to supplying some of its electricity with renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and bioenergy with a goal to meet 10% by 2015, we need to do more. (more…)

Back to school: Are children ready to learn?

Added August 26th, 2014 by Jan Hudson | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Jan Hudson

For children to succeed in school, they must go to school “ready to learn” —  rested, fed and healthy. But how many children will start the school year with a toothache or other dental problem?

According to the Department of Community Health’s 2011 -2012 Count Your Smiles survey, the number is likely pretty high. (more…)

Poverty and third grade reading proficiency: A problem for Michigan’s children

Added August 5th, 2014 by Gilda Z. Jacobs | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Gilda Z. Jacobs

The new 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book brings attention to national and state-level data on the well-being of children and the results are sobering for Michigan, with more children living in poverty and trailing behind in education.

Despite an uptick in Michigan’s economy, a quarter of Michigan’s children live in poverty with much higher rates for children of color, and the state ranks 38th in the education domain in this year’s report, with 69 percent of fourth graders below reading proficiency.

The world economy is demanding an educated workforce and reading proficiency is at the center. Without investing in these children long before they reach the end of third grade, we are choosing to jeopardize the long-term growth and economic development of our state. (more…)

Shooting ourselves in the foot

Added July 28th, 2014 by Judy Putnam | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Judy Putnam

Michigan and the seven other states that cut unemployment benefits in the wake of the Great Recession caused financial hardship for unemployed workers and failed to boost the overall economic outlooks of the states, a new report from the Economic Policy Institute concludes.

Problems with the unemployment system actually stemmed from underfunding the state trust funds in good times, rather than paying out benefits too generously, the report concludes. And cutting benefits not only shortchanged jobless workers and their families, it undermined the countercyclical role of the unemployment system that is designed to kick in when times are tough. (more…)

KIDS COUNT at 25!

Added July 22nd, 2014 by Judy Putnam | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Judy Putnam

Life for Michigan kids improved in important ways since 1990 with fewer children dying and fewer births to teens, the 25th edition of the KIDS COUNT Data Book, released today, finds.

These are heartening trends because they prove that good public policy does make a positive difference. For example, the state’s graduated driver’s license helped reduced the number of teens dying on the highway and sustained public health and education campaigns resulted in fewer teen pregnancies. (more…)

Maternal and infant risks in Michigan’s legacy cities

Added June 17th, 2014 by Jane Zehnder-Merrell | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Jane Zehnder-Merrell

Roughly one of every four children in the state lives in one of Michigan’s legacy cities located across the southern half of the state’s Lower Peninsula. These legacy cities, once economic and social powerhouses, are now, in many cases, struggling with population loss and high unemployment.

Perhaps, not so surprising, risks to maternal and infant well-being are generally worse within these cities than the out-county areas in the counties where they are located.

The latest analysis of Right Start in Michigan, an annual report from Kids Count in Michigan, examines eight indicators to assess maternal and infant risks across the 15 so-called legacy cities. Only Ann Arbor, which has actually thrived in the new post-industrial economy, shows lower risk on almost all indicators than the out-county. (more…)

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