League In The News


WSJM AM (St. Joseph): Advocacy groups praise state budget

Governor Rick Snyder signed the new state budget on Friday. It’s a plan some analysts describe as both promising and concerning. Rachel Richards, with the Michigan League for Public Policy, tells us the $56.5 half billion state budget includes several measures to help the state’s most vulnerable residents. They include extending the “heat and eat” program and more funding for the “Double Up Food Bucks” program, both of which increase access to healthy foods. Richards adds the budget also improves child-care assistance, by increasing eligibility and raising payments to providers. July 14, 2017 —WSJM AM (St. Joseph)

Public News Service: Governor Snyder expected to sign budget

Rachel Richards, legislative coordinator for the Michigan League for Public Policy, says the $56.5 billion state budget includes a number of measures to help the state’s most vulnerable residents.

They include extending the Heat and Eat program and more funding for the Double Up Food Bucks program, both of which increase access to healthy foods.

Richards adds the budget also improves child care assistance by increasing eligibility and raising payments to providers.

“It’s an economic engine to allow parents to work, as well as helping employers reduce absenteeism and turnover, as well as providing an early learning environment by increasing access to higher quality care,” she points out. July 14, 2017 — Public News Service

Rochester Patch: Local Businesses Wanted

Nearly 300,000 children in southeastern Michigan depend on school-provided free or reduced-fee meals. When school is out, these children are home and are at risk of missing important meals. According to the 2016 Kids Count Michigan study, child poverty has gone up in 80 of 83 Michigan counties since 2006, including in all five counties Gleaners serves. A 2015 Journal of Adolescent Health review found that children who participated in school breakfast or lunch programs showed significant improvement in grades and standardized test scores as well as having fewer school absences. July 10, 2017 — Rochester Patch

White Lake Beacon: 22 percent of Michigan children in poverty in 2015

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — An annual report reveals that about 22 percent — or 486,000 Michigan children — lived in poverty in 2015.

The 2017 Kids Count Profile by the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation was released Tuesday and looks at health, education, economic well-being and family and community as part of a national effort to improve conditions for children and their families. July 10, 2017 — White Lake Beacon

Daily Detroit: Hunger Free Summer Food Fight urges local businesses to step up to fight hunger, feed children

According to the 2016 Kids Count Michigan study, child poverty has gone up in 80 of 83 Michigan counties since 2006.

With that in mind, Gleaners Community Food Bank is asking businesses and organizations in southeast Michigan to help fight childhood hunger by joining the 23rd Annual Hunger Free Summer Food Fight starting Monday, July 17, 2017 through Friday, July 28, 2017. July 9, 2017 — Daily Detroit

Bridge Magazine: Kids count, but to judge from Michigan’s well-being data, not very much

Understanding the problem takes facts. That’s where the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s national Kids Count Data Book comes in. The 2017 edition, released in June, ranks Michigan 32nd in the nation for child well-being, and in the bottom 10 states for education, ranking 41st. It is particularly concerning that Michigan is moving in the wrong direction on most indicators. Column by Program Director, David McGhee, Skillman Foundation. July 7, 2017 — Bridge Magazine

Oakland Press: Column by League CEO Gilda Z. Jacobs: Jacobs: Income tax cut is wrong answer for a stronger Michigan

Regardless of your political leanings, we all agree that we want a vibrant and thriving Michigan. This was true when I proudly served Oakland County in the Michigan Legislature from 1998-2010, and I imagine it is just as true in today’s Legislature.

But there is a growing divide over how best to achieve that. Some current legislators argue that eliminating Michigan’s state income tax is the magic bullet to resolve our economic woes. However, in my work at the helm of the Michigan League for Public Policy, which has been around for more than a century and seen countless political trends come and go, I know that the opposite — investment — is a much more effective way forward.  July 5, 2017 — Oakland Press

Bridge Magazine: Column by League Board Chair Charles Ballard: Only in a fantasy world do tax cuts pay for themselves

Michigan’s roads and bridges are crumbling. Our water and sewer systems are aging. Cuts to state support for higher education have led to skyrocketing tuition at public universities in Michigan. So naturally, some members of the Michigan Legislature want to cut taxes.

The First Rule of Holes is that if you’re in a hole, you should stop digging. It seems that some members of the Legislature are unaware of the First Rule of Holes. June 29, 2017 — Bridge Magazine

WKAR Radio (East Lansing): McConnell Suspends Healthcare Debate

McConnell pushed Senate consideration on legislation that would repeal the act, delaying further action until after the fourth of July recess.

Emily Schwarzkopf is an analyst with the Michigan League for Public Policy. She says she was pleased to hear about the delay.

“Well I think we definitely see it as a small win, and we’re very thankful for all of the advocates and people that are very concerned about what the senate and the house are trying to pass,” said Schwarzkopf. June 28, 2017 — WKAR Radio (East Lansing)

Associated Press/WLNS CBS TV 6 (Lansing): Michigan Senate gives final approval to $56.7 billion budget

Republicans say the budget includes record spending on K-12 education, money to train new state troopers and addresses debt in the teacher retirement system.

Programs to support food assistance and help with heating costs also were included in the budget.

That drew praise from the Michigan League for Public Policy. That group’s President and CEO Gilda Jacobs said “The decision to continue funding the Healthy Michigan Plan is a win for all Michiganians—especially the 660,000 residents who rely on the plan for healthcare.”  June 22, 2017 — Associated Press/WLNS CBS TV 6 (Lansing)

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