More child care oversight needed

Added January 8th, 2015 by Pat Sorenson | Email This Entry Email This Entry
Pat Sorenson

Every day in Michigan, parents head out to work with their young children in tow, dropping them off at local child care centers or homes. Child care is a necessity for many working families because they rely on two incomes to make ends meet or because they are raising children as single parents.

Yet oversight of health and safety requirements is stretched far too thin in Michigan, a new policy brief from the League concludes.

Child care centers and homes are required to be licensed or registered with the state to ensure that basic requirements are met. Two federal audits and national studies have found that Michigan falls short in its efforts to inspect child care settings. The unacceptable reality is that parents cannot rest assured that their children are spending their days in care that consistently meets state licensing standards.

The risk to children is greatest in families earning low wages, including parents who are required to work 40 hours a week as a condition of receiving public assistance. Low-wage families have fewer options and face difficult choices because they cannot afford higher quality child care that comes at a higher cost.

These are the facts:

  • Michigan cannot provide adequate oversight of child care because the state’s child care inspectors have caseloads that are more than three times the national standard. Child care inspectors in Michigan have average caseloads of 153, with a nationally recommended ratio of 1 worker for every 50 child care programs.
  • In unannounced visits, federal auditors found that child care providers failed to comply with one or more state health and safety requirements. Most disturbing was the fact that half of the family and group child care providers had not done required criminal and protective services background checks, and none of the child care centers had completed those checks on their employees.
  • A national report gave Michigan a “D” grade for its child care centers regulations and oversight, citing ineffective monitoring.
  • Michigan was one of eight states that received a score of 0 out of a possible 150 points for its licensing of child care homes, primarily because of a failure to inspect homes before they are registered and children are placed into care.

The state inspects a range of services in order to protect the public including restaurants, roads and bridges, and grocery stores. Certainly the state’s youngest children, who are in child care so their parents can work to support them, deserve to be at the top of the list.

— Pat Sorenson

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