Economic recovery leaves Michigan children behind

Michigan is the “comeback state,” so we’ve heard. But, for whom? Michigan has more children living in poverty now than it did in the last full year of the Great Recession. Not only that, but since 2008, there are more children whose parents lack secure employment and more children living in concentrated poverty. Children and families in Michigan are being left behind in the economic recovery.

According to the new 2015 Kids Count Data Book from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Michigan’s ranking in overall child well-being has fallen for the second straight year. The state now ranks 33rd in the country overall, while other states that have chosen to invest in programs that support economic growth and people are doing better, like Minnesota, which ranks first in the country for overall child well-being.

The report, which focuses on key trends in child well-being in the post-recession years, ranks Michigan in four domains:

  • Education: 37th
  • Economic well-being: 33rd
  • Family and community: 29th
  • Health: 23rd

It is clear that the strategy to reduce taxes and disinvest in programs that support families has not worked. Even after significant tax breaks for corporations, parents are still struggling to find good-paying and stable jobs to achieve financial security for themselves and their children. The data book reveals that the number of children with parents without secure employment increased to 33%. That is a rate increase of 6% since the last year of the Great Recession and ranks Michigan in the bottom third of states.

We also continue to have an unacceptable number of children living in poverty and a widening economic gap between white children and children of color. The data book reports that the child poverty rate in Michigan increased by 26% with nearly one in every four children living in poverty, including nearly one in every two African American children and almost one in every three Latino children. Also startling is the increasing number of children living in high-poverty neighborhoods. The rate increased by 21%.

Given the impact that poverty has on educational outcomes, it isn’t surprising that the state’s lowest ranking is in education. The number of students considered not proficient in math and reading stagnated over the period in the data book. These trends occurred at the same time that the state made cuts in education spending. Although, in the upcoming budget year, over $31 million has been dedicated to initiatives and programs to improve third-grade reading, including some funding for early childhood investments—critical to long-term outcomes.

The state has had some substantial wins in children’s health since the Great Recession, such as a continued reduction in the number of kids without insurance, the number of teen births, and the number of teens using alcohol and drugs. However, these gains are overshadowed by the large number of kids living in poverty and poor educational outcomes.

If we are really to help children in our state thrive, we need to understand the importance of providing parents with the tools and support they need. Taking a two-generation approach is a proven practice to improve outcomes for children by ensuring that parents have access to opportunities like adult education, higher-wage jobs with benefits, and quality affordable child care. We also need a fair tax system that includes the state Earned Income Tax Credit, a proven poverty reduction tool. And, we need to continue strong investments in early childhood programs to ensure that kids are ready to learn by the time they get to school.

 – Alicia Guevara Warren

Schools out! Why some kids aren’t as excited for summer

As we counted down the last days of the school year, most of us were excited planning our summer vacations and camps. At the same time, too many kids were wondering how they were going to eat over the summer – something most of us take for granted.

During 2013, more than 737,000 students were eligible for free or reduced price meals at school but only a small portion of these students are fed through Summer Nutrition Programs, leaving them at risk of going hungry.

According to the most recent Food Research & Action Center report, “Hunger Doesn’t Take a Vacation: Summer Nutrition Status Report,” the number of children getting meals over the summer has increased, yet only 16 of every 100 low-income children in the country was served.

 The federal Summer Nutrition Programs help ensure that children who rely on school breakfast and lunch during the school year continue to have access to meals over the summer. These meal programs, including the Summer Food Service Program and National School Lunch Program, are housed at schools and nonprofits, such as food banks and community action agencies, and are often coupled with recreation activities for students during the day while parents are working.

Like 42 other states, Michigan saw an increase of nearly 12% from 2013 to 2014 in the number of children receiving meals through the Summer Nutrition Programs. However, the state continues to rank in the bottom half of states at 31st. Last July, in Michigan about 13 of every 100 low-income children were served through a summer meal program. FRAC suggests that every state should aim to have about 40 children participating for every 100 receiving free or reduced-price lunch during the school year. Based on that goal it is estimated that Michigan forgoes about $11.5 million in federal reimbursement for Summer Nutrition Programs.

Congress is scheduled to reauthorize child nutrition programs in the fall, and the report offers several recommendations to ensure that more children are returning to school in the fall healthy and ready to learn:

  • Lowering the eligibility test to increase the number of participating sites. Currently, most participating sites qualify by demonstrating that they are located in an area where 50% of the kids are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals. The report advocates for lowering the threshold to 40% to capture more rural areas.
  • Streamlining administrative requirements to allow nonprofit and local government agencies to provide meals year-round rather than having to operate two child nutrition programs, which have duplicative requirements. Schools already are allowed to do this through the National School Lunch Program Seamless Summer Option.
  • Allowing agencies to provide three meals a day instead of two to help serve children who are provided full-day care while their parents work and for teenagers who participate in evening activities.
  • Providing grants for transportation—one of the most significant barriers to participation, especially in rural areas.
  • Expanding access through the use of the Summer Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) cards, a concept that was tested through the USDA Summer Demonstration Projects. Michigan was fortunate to receive a grant for $5.5 million for this program, which is expected to serve 40,599 children this summer.

 –Alicia Guevara Warren

Third grade reading, adult ed must be restored

For Immediate Release
March 24, 2015

Contact: Stacey Range Messina
smessina@mlpp.org
517.487.5436 |  517.214.5994 after 3 p.m.

 

New reports prove need for investments, not cuts

LANSING – A House Appropriations subcommittee today eliminated all funding next year for adult education and for Gov. Snyder’s proposed third grade reading initiative, bucking recommendations of two new reports proving the dire need to boost both areas.

Promoting Early Literacy in Michigan,” released today by the Michigan League for Public Policy, asserts that the ability to read by the end of third grade is central to a child’s success in school, life-long earning potential, and ability to contribute to the nation’s economy. But in 2013 almost two of every five Michigan third-graders did not demonstrate reading proficiency on the MEAP, according to the Michigan Department of Education. About 10,000 of those 40,000 students scored at the most elementary level. Most students who fail to achieve this critical milestone fall further behind and often drop out before earning a high school diploma.

Willing to Work and Ready to Learn: More Adult Education Would Strengthen Michigan’s Economy,” released by the Michigan League for Public Policy earlier this month, shows that too few adults are getting the basic skills education they need to succeed in occupational training and find a way out of low-paying, dead-end jobs and into careers that can support their families.

(more…)

Why kids count

Recent news reports celebrate the decline in the unemployment rate and the quickened tempo of the recovery. But four years into the recovery, Michigan’s child poverty rates remain consistently high.

In 2013, one of every four children in Michigan lived in a family with income below the federal poverty level (roughly $18,800 for a single-parent family of three and $23,600 for a two-parent family of four), according to the latest Kids Count in Michigan Data Book, released today. (more…)

Many kids stuck in poverty without solutions

Contact: Judy Putnam or Jane Zehnder-Merrell, 517.487.5436

Kids Count in Mich. ranks 82 counties on child well-being

LANSING, Mich. – Too many kids in Michigan remain mired in poverty at a time when policymakers have reduced help for struggling families, according to the Kids Count in Michigan Data Book 2015 released today.

Three measures of economic conditions worsened over the trend period with nearly one in every four children living in an impoverished household, a 35 percent increase in child poverty over six years. The trend period measured from 2006 to 2012 or 2013, depending on the availability of data.

(more…)

‘Yes’ on road funding is right direction

From the League’s First Tuesday newsletter
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It’s a pivotal time for Michigan public policy. Decisions made in the next few months will determine the path Michigan takes into the future.

In three short months, voters on May 5 will decide Proposal 1, the road funding package. There’s no doubt that this is Michigan’s single best chance to raise sorely needed money to pay for road repairs and put new dollars into school classrooms all while protecting families earning the least. (more…)

More child care oversight needed

Every day in Michigan, parents head out to work with their young children in tow, dropping them off at local child care centers or homes. Child care is a necessity for many working families because they rely on two incomes to make ends meet or because they are raising children as single parents.

Yet oversight of health and safety requirements is stretched far too thin in Michigan, a new policy brief from the League concludes. (more…)

Maintaining cultural ties and family stability for American Indian Children

American Indian children in Michigan are the most likely to be removed from their homes due to abuse and/or neglect: 1.5 times the rate of white children and the highest of all children of color in the state, according to the Michigan Race Equity Coalition. They are also more likely to age out of the foster care system. It is disturbing, however, that the rate of investigation for abuse and/or neglect is lower compared with white children. (more…)

‘Heat and eat’ — another squandered opportunity

Michigan is being penny-wise and pound-foolish, refusing to pay $3 million to bring in $137 million in federal food assistance to 150,000 low-income households.

There are two issues in play here. The first is is that the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly food stamps) does not keep up with family food costs. The second is that Michigan has been able to raise SNAP benefits by an average of $76 per household, but now refuses to do so. (more…)

Oh Michigan!

From the First Tuesday newsletter
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‘O’ stands for October — and it also stands for Opportunity.

With just a few short weeks before the Nov. 4 election, now is your best chance as a concerned Michigan citizen to make a difference. (more…)

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