Two generation policies offer support for parents and kids

On Monday, October 26th, the Michigan League for Public Policy held our annual meeting and public policy forum, “Secure Parents and Successful Kids.” We were joined by more than 250 people from around the state and a host of national and state experts and innovators in the fields of education, economic security and child well-being to discuss a two-generation approach to tackling poverty.

Our keynote speaker was Anne Mosle, who directs Ascend at the Aspen Institute in Washington, D.C. Ascend is a national hub for breakthrough ideas and collaborations that move children and their parents towards educational success and economic security—the very definition of a two generation approach.

Anne began her presentation with a short video on the Jeremiah Program. Jeremiah provides single mothers and their children with a safe, affordable place to live, quality early childhood education, life skills training and support for career-track education. The video summarizes the dilemma many low-income families face, and how two generation strategies can help. Oftentimes these families are so focused on surviving and getting by that they are unable to succeed and move up. But if they have support in the moment, they can start planning for and building toward the future.

As Anne stated, we have to meet people where they are and develop a plan for where they want to go. Equity doesn’t just happen. It has to be an intentional commitment instead. For example, $3,000 in extra family income can increase a child’s economic trajectory by over 20%.

Anne and her colleagues at Ascend have put together a booklet, Top Ten for 2Gen, that includes policy ideas and principles to advance two-generation efforts. It outlines the keys to success and stability that all families need, and they are the same areas where the League is working in Michigan: early education, postsecondary education and employment pathways, health and well-being, social capital and economic assets.

Anne’s presentation was followed by a panel discussion on two-generation policies and approaches in Michigan with Tim Becker, chief deputy director, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services; Carol Goss, former CEO of the Skillman Foundation; Dr. Ali Webb, director of Michigan programs, W.K. Kellogg Foundation; and Mindy Ysasi, executive director, The SOURCE.

Tim Becker shared a presentation on the “River of Opportunity” and noted that it is in his department and the state’s best interest to try a two generation approach to better help children and families together. Having worked in human resources for some of the state’s leading organizations, Mindy Ysasi said that workplace policy is a key area where a two generation approach is needed and that “the people who need the most flexibility have the least flexibility.”

The panel also delved into Michigan’s political climate and racial inequity. The League also recently examined the racial disparities in the state budget that are perpetuating poverty for people of color in Michigan.

A large focus of the discussion was that everyone’s work on poverty and two generation policies is still largely dependent on the Legislature and the budget. Dr. Ali Webb and Carol Goss talked about the efforts of foundations like theirs, but that it is not enough without policy changes at the state level. Michigan’s state budget of a couple hundred billion can have way more of an impact than any one foundation.

Research shows that two-generation programs and policies are a win-win for children, their families and the state, and should have universal appeal to nonprofit and service organizations and elected officials. The League’s public policy forum was a good start, but there is much work ahead to truly start implementing two generation policies in Michigan.

 – Gilda Z. Jacobs

New plan paves roads on the backs of working families

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The Michigan Earned Income Tax Credit lets working families who earn low wages or who have fallen on hard times keep more of what they earn to afford the basics. But House Republicans are proposing to help fix Michigan’s roads by eliminating the state EITC– hiking taxes on 820,000 working families raising 1 million kids.

Eliminating the EITC to pay for roads amounts to robbing poor Peter to pay Paul. The $117 million saved by eliminating the credit is a drop in the bucket of a $1.2 billion transportation plan, but a huge amount to families, including military families, who need the credit to make ends meet. (more…)

Road funding ballot proposal: a win-win for everyone

Supporting the passage of the May ballot proposal to increase the sales tax by a penny to fund roads is a win-win. It would benefit working families struggling to make ends meet, schools, local communities, and public transit all while fixing Michigan’s crumbling roads and bridges.

When the Legislature voted to put the sales tax increase before the voters, it tied the passage of the ballot proposal with measures to protect low-income workers and increase funding for schools, local communities, and public transportation.


Child poverty in the 21st century

The number of Michigan children living in families with income below the poverty level drops by half when tax and non-cash benefits are included as income, according to the latest analysis from the national KIDS COUNT project at the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The percentage of the state’s children who would be living in poverty if no government program benefits and tax credits were available, however, stood at 30 percent, as calculated by the Supplemental Poverty Measure. (more…)

Why kids count

Recent news reports celebrate the decline in the unemployment rate and the quickened tempo of the recovery. But four years into the recovery, Michigan’s child poverty rates remain consistently high.

In 2013, one of every four children in Michigan lived in a family with income below the federal poverty level (roughly $18,800 for a single-parent family of three and $23,600 for a two-parent family of four), according to the latest Kids Count in Michigan Data Book, released today. (more…)

‘Yes’ on road funding is right direction

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It’s a pivotal time for Michigan public policy. Decisions made in the next few months will determine the path Michigan takes into the future.

In three short months, voters on May 5 will decide Proposal 1, the road funding package. There’s no doubt that this is Michigan’s single best chance to raise sorely needed money to pay for road repairs and put new dollars into school classrooms all while protecting families earning the least. (more…)

Happy 40th Birthday, EITC!

Today is EITC Awareness Day, and this year marks the 40th anniversary of the widely recognized tool that lifts millions of working families and children out of poverty each year. States have the opportunity to build on the federal credit, which Michigan does. However, in 2011 the state’s Earned Income Tax Credit was cut leaving behind over 15,000 families in poverty in 2012. On May 5, the voters will have the opportunity to restore the credit by supporting an increase in the sales tax by one penny.

The Michigan EITC is only available to families who have earned income from working. The credit ensures that working families are better able to make ends meet. When combined with the federal EITC, working families are lifted out of poverty and children experience better outcomes, such as improved infant and maternal health; better school performance; greater college enrollment; increased work and earnings in the next generation; and Social Security retirement benefits. All of which also benefit Michigan’s economy. (more…)

Restoring the Michigan EITC Will Help Working Families


The Michigan Earned Income Tax Credit is one of the most effective tools for supporting working families and reducing poverty. Michigan lawmakers approved restoration of the state EITC to 20%, if voters had approved the penny sales tax increase on May 5 to pay for needed road repairs and to support schools. However, the proposal was defeated, and the state EITC is now targeted for elimination to help pay for road improvements.

The Michigan EITC was cut by 70% as a result of major tax changes that took place in 2011. The Michigan Legislature and Gov. Snyder reduced Michigan’s EITC from 20% of the federal EITC to 6%. Most EITC recipients claim the credit only temporarily when a job disruption or other significant event reduces their income. A recent study found that, of people who received the EITC over an 18-year period, 61% received the credit for only one or two years at a time. The EITC has also been shown to have a long-lasting, positive effect on children, helping them do better and go farther in school. The EITC also increases work effort and expands Michigan’s economy.

The EITC provides working families with additional options for housing, child care, and transportation so that the family can remain in the labor force and take steps toward self-sufficiency. Restoring the EITC to 20% will lift an estimated 15,000 families above poverty and lessen the impact of poverty on 800,000 families, including more than 1 million children.



Celebrating good public policy in Michigan

Restoring the Earned Income Tax Credit, part of the bipartisan compromise on road funding approved early today, will be a boost to struggling families across Michigan.

If voters agree to the package, it will put extra dollars into working households where families have the hardest time making ends meet. It’s designed to offset additional costs from an increase in the state sales tax and wholesale gas tax to pay to fix Michigan’s battered roads. (more…)

Oh Michigan!

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‘O’ stands for October — and it also stands for Opportunity.

With just a few short weeks before the Nov. 4 election, now is your best chance as a concerned Michigan citizen to make a difference. (more…)

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