League testifies against bill to strip Medicaid from struggling Michiganders, shares real story

For Immediate Release
May 2, 2018

Contact:
Alex Rossman
arossman@mlpp.org
517-487-5436

House Appropriations Committee takes up SB 897 but delays vote

LANSING—The Michigan League for Public Policy issued the following statement on the Michigan House Appropriations Committee’s hearing today on Senate Bill 897 that would take vital coverage away from Medicaid beneficiaries who don’t meet rigid work requirements. The committee could vote on the legislation as early as next week. The statement can be attributed to Michigan League for Public Policy President and CEO Gilda Z. Jacobs, who also provided testimony at today’s hearing.

“As I sat before nearly 30 lawmakers today, I offered something that should resonate with every single one of them on why taking away Medicaid from people who are unable to work is a bad idea. The League and our partners have appealed to legislators’ brains, their pocketbooks—or the state’s—and their hearts, sharing myriad data and evidence that shows Medicaid is a work support, analyses that it will come with significant costs, and real stories from real people on how it will hurt struggling residents. The House Fiscal Agency analysis shows the bill would cause 105,000 struggling Michiganders to lose coverage—and that’s not something to celebrate. This bill will increase uncompensated care costs and the program will cost the state $20-$30 million annually. And it will hurt a majority of Michiganders that it claims it will help. The House seems to be following the Senate’s lead in rushing through this bill before truly understanding its consequences, but without a vote today, we still have time to change their minds.”

As part of her testimony today, Jacobs shared a personal story from Karen Schultz Tarnopol, an Oakland County resident who attested firsthand to the value of Medicaid and the threat of this bill. An excerpt of Karen’s story is included below.

“I was a single parent of two kids with a very good job…In 2008, when the market crashed…I lost my job with no notice, severance, insurance, etc. I spent many years trying to reestablish myself and had many jobs along the way. Because my work wasn’t consistent and/or for the same employer all the time, it would have been an arduous task to report a running 29-hour a week schedule to DHS [now the Department of Health and Human Services].

“While my kids and I were on Medicaid, something I signed up for reluctantly due to stupid pride, my son had open heart surgery and I had breast cancer. Medicaid paid every dime for both of us. As a mother, I was able to concentrate on caring for my sick son, and when I was undergoing treatment, I was not financially burdened with the medical bills and was able to focus on getting well and caring for my kids. Do not underestimate the significance of having good health care. If we didn’t have this insurance our story would have been significantly altered. Being on Medicaid and food stamps is not something I wanted to be on, and we are no longer on either program, but it made all the difference in the world when I needed it.”

The following groups opposed Senate Bill 897 in committee today: Center for Civil Justice; Michigan Protection and Advocacy Services; National Association of Social Workers – Michigan Chapter; American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network; American Lung Association; Washtenaw Health Plan; The Arc Michigan; Michigan Health & Hospital Association; American Heart Association; Ascension Health; Michigan Council for Maternal & Child Health; Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; United Way for Southeastern Michigan; Elder Law & Disability Rights Section – State Bar of Michigan; ACCESS; American Diabetes Association; McLaren Health Plan; Henry Ford Health System; Michigan Community Action; Michigan Catholic Conference; Trinity Healthy; Planned Parenthood.

Background:

From the Michigan League for Public Policy:

Blog: Is the Legislature even listening? (Includes excerpts of five personal stories.)

Fact Sheet: SB 897: Medicaid work requirements

Report: Medicaid Work Requirements: Why Making People Work Doesn’t Work

From the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities:

Report: Michigan Medicaid Proposal Would Lead to Large Coverage Losses, Harm Low-Income Workers

Blog: Michigan’s Medicaid Proposal Would Harm Low-Income Workers — And Can’t Be Fixed

From the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation, the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, and Poverty Solutions at the University of Michigan:

Column: Medicaid work bill could hurt, not help, people who want to work

Column: Beware of unintended consequences of Michigan Medicaid work demand

Fact Sheet: Proposed Work Requirements for Medicaid in Michigan

From ACCESS and the Michigan Disability Rights Coalition:

Column: Protect Healthy Michigan as is

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The Michigan League for Public Policy, www.mlpp.org, is a nonprofit policy institute focused on economic opportunity for all. It is the only state-level organization that addresses poverty in a comprehensive way.

Is the Legislature even listening?

From the First Tuesday newsletter
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As a legislator I took seriously my duty to serve the people I represented. I made it a priority to stay informed, to read the latest data and reports on each issue, and to ask experts for their opinions. But one of the most important aspects of my work was to listen. My constituents were not just data points. They were people. It was my job to hear their voices, and I’ve carried that priority with me to the League.

Unfortunately, listening to constituents and making informed decisions appears to be a lost art in the Legislature. Two weeks ago, the Michigan Senate passed Senate Bill 897, a proposal to take away Medicaid and the Healthy Michigan Plan from folks who don’t work a stringent number of hours. On May 2, I testified in opposition to this bill in the House Appropriations Committee, but they may take it up for a vote any day now. Please help stop it.

 

(Wes Stafford, Wednesday, May 28, 2008) The waiting room fills long before patients are seen Wednesdays at the Helen M. Nickless Health Clinic, 1458 W. Center Road, Hampton Township.

(Wes Stafford, Wednesday, May 28, 2008) The waiting room fills long before patients are seen Wednesdays at the Helen M. Nickless Health Clinic, 1458 W. Center Road, Hampton Township.

 

In pushing this legislation, Republican lawmakers are ignoring state and federal data and analysis, the large group of advocates opposing this bill, and the hundreds of concerned residents that have reached out to their offices. And they are disregarding the real Michiganders who would be impacted—real Michiganders who have been sharing their stories and fears with us.

Ralph H. is self-employed and works from home because he needs to care for his wife, who is disabled. For 10 years, Ralph went without health insurance, as many self-employed people do. When he was approved for the Healthy Michigan Plan, Ralph was finally able to get surgery for a blood clot. Since being on the plan, he still lacks stable income, but at least he hasn’t been worried about his basic healthcare needs. “Some months, we’re lucky if we have $100 left over, once we pay all our bills, so we’re hardly running away with the state’s money.”

He’s nervous because due to the lack of information and clarity on the bill, he’s not sure he can continue to receive healthcare. “Without the coverage, I would essentially be thrown back into the situation that I confronted before I finally got it. That’s one more worry that I certainly do without.”

Kristen H. (no relation) shared a cautionary story with us. She lost her job—and insurance coverage—when her daughter was diagnosed with a genetic syndrome and required more care than Kristen could manage while working. It’s every parent’s nightmare. Kristen, a single mom, found herself suddenly unemployed, with no insurance, and caring for three kids, including a child facing major health issues. “The next several years were very difficult financially as I wasn’t able to work, but we managed to get by. I ended up having a minor surgery during that time that could have seriously impacted my health. Without Medicaid, I may have put off getting care, resulting in serious harm. I may not have been here to provide care not only for my disabled daughter, but my other two children as well. It not only could have impacted my health, but I could have ended up in a financial hole I couldn’t get out of as well.”

Because of Medicaid, Kristen was able to care for her daughter and eventually she was able to work again. But she’s terrified for other parents who might find themselves in her situation: “I would have been one of the individuals who may not be here today if these requirements were in place when my family so desperately needed the safety net that Medicaid provided.”

Therese O. is a 54-year-old widow who receives Medicaid. She couldn’t afford insurance payments after her husband died, and she now works from home. Her work, though, doesn’t offer healthcare and she doesn’t earn enough to purchase it on her own. “This proposal to make Medicaid recipients work 29 hours per week will cause me to lose my Medicaid. If I could work that much, I wouldn’t need Medicaid. I am housebound and I have no family to help me.”

Mitch and Julie B. are married and both self-employed. While Mitch is a veteran and has health insurance through Veterans Affairs, he wrote that “the only way we can afford healthcare for my wife is with Medicaid.” They are worried about how self-employed people will prove their work hours. But they have another concern—homeschooling their daughter. As Julie shared, “Between the two of us we work 60+ hours a week so that one of us can be with our child. Why should one of us have to get a low-paying job so that we can put her in school, pay for childcare and afterschool care?”

These are just some of the stories we’ve heard. Other potential concerns include people who work seasonal jobs or people in the service industry with unpredictable work hours, and those with mental health challenges. People like Ralph, Kristen, Therese, Mitch and Julie, and others need to know they can continue receiving healthcare. They are already living in perilous situations, uncertain from week to week whether they’ll be able to afford the basics. We’re terribly concerned that some in the Legislature seem to be ignoring stories like these and are instead insisting on cutting people off.

Stable healthcare allows people to work. Taking away healthcare just creates yet another barrier to holding down a job to support one’s family. These requirements would be a great burden to patients, hospitals, employers and state offices. The question I’m wondering is, “Other than the perceived health of some candidates’ campaigns, who is this poorly conceived policy really helping?”

— Gilda Z. Jacobs

What to watch for in 2019 state budget

The state budget is a big focus of the League’s work each year, and often our most viable opportunity for victories for the people and kids of Michigan. And while we were disappointed that lawmakers passed a personal exemption increase, it should not affect this year’s budget as much as earlier proposals (the bigger cuts will be left to future legislators instead).

budgetandmagnifier175-by-116Here are the main things good and bad in—or absent from—Governor Rick Snyder’s 2019 budget that the League is keeping an eye on as the legislative process gets underway. You can learn more about these issues in our “First Look” at the governor’s budget and we will continue to provide updates on our budget page.

thumbs up The Good
  • Continues funding for the “heat and eat” policy that provides increased food assistance to families with low incomes, people with disabilities and seniors.
  • Supports the Healthy Michigan Plan that has provided health insurance for over 675,000 Michigan residents.
  • Provides $5 million for Michigan’s Early On program that identifies and serves infants and toddlers with developmental delays—the first investment of state funds in Michigan’s grossly underfunded early intervention program.
  • Provides a small increase in monthly Family Independence Program income support provided to children in deep poverty after decades of flat funding that pushed families to less than 30% of the federal poverty line.
  • Provides increases of between $120 and $240 per-pupil for the state’s public schools—with additional funding for students in high school or career and technical education.
  • Expands funding for partnerships with school districts that are needing academic supports from $6 million to $8 million.
thumbs down The Bad
  • Continues funding for Michigan’s successful preschool program for at-risk four-year-olds, but does not expand services to three-year-olds from families with low incomes.
  • Fails to expand funding for At-Risk School Aid and the school-based literacy programs needed to prevent the retention of children in third grade, including a disproportionate number of children of color.
  • Does not increase funding for adult education after deep cuts over the last two decades.
  • Leaves in place Michigan’s child care assistance eligibility cutoff, which is one of the lowest in the nation.
  • Diverts School Aid money intended for K-12 public schools to fund the state’s community colleges—rather than securing adequate General Fund revenues for post-secondary education.
  • Does not restore financial aid for an increasing number of college students who are older and supporting families.
  • Reduces cities, villages and townships (CVT) and county revenue sharing payments, neither of which have received full statutory funding in nearly two decades, so that many communities would either receive decreased CVT and county revenue sharing payments or no payment at all.
question mark The Absent

The League will keep pushing for these and other budget priorities in the coming months, and advocate for racial, ethnic and social justice in all state budget decisions this year and every year. We also encourage you to use our advocacy tips and budget timeline to get involved and speak up for the priorities you believe in.

— Alex Rossman

Governor’s budget continues key investments, urges Legislature to abandon risky revenue cuts

For Immediate Release 
February 7, 2018

Contact:
Alex Rossman
arossman@mlpp.org
517.487.5436

Snyder recommends funding for education, roads, public safety, healthcare and more

LANSING—Following Governor Rick Snyder’s 2019 budget presentation, the Michigan League for Public Policy voiced support for his calls for continued investment in vital programs, and echoed his warning against reckless tax cuts by the Legislature. The League also called for a solution to Michigan’s ongoing revenue problem, and urged action on its own budget priorities as ways the Legislature can have a more significant impact on state residents’ well-being than a tax cut.

“There were a lot of great proposals in the governor’s budget today, including new and first-time funding for Early On, efforts to increase the existing low level of Family Independence Program cash assistance, and continued investments to support Michigan’s kids and families through ‘heat and eat,’ the Healthy Michigan Plan, lead pipe replacement in Flint, roads and public safety,” said Gilda Z. Jacobs, president and CEO of the Michigan League for Public Policy. “These are all longstanding priorities for the League and we appreciate the governor’s recognition that they are key to a better Michigan for everyone. But these very items could be first on the chopping block for the Legislature as they seek to reconcile hundreds of millions of dollars in ineffective and unaffordable tax cuts that give very little money back to most taxpayers.”

While the governor’s budget contained many positives today, there weren’t a lot of dramatic funding increases, because the money is simply not there as a result of previous policy decisions. The major tax cuts passed over the past several years have put Michigan’s budget in an untenable situation where we are unable to make significant investments in all of the things that state residents, businesses and communities depend on. League budget experts continue to sound the alarm on the decline in the purchasing power of the state’s General Fund—which is now estimated to be nearly 6 percent lower than the level in 1968 when adjusted for inflation.

“Michigan has a revenue problem, and has for decades. Lawmakers are still budgeting like it’s 1968,” Jacobs said. “The Legislature is still trying to make Michigan competitive with other states while picking the wrong role models. The Legislature is still underinvesting in nearly everything kids, families, workers and businesses depend on. And disregarding past mistakes, the Legislature is still looking to cut taxes when they should be raising revenue.”

As the budget process gets officially underway today, the League continues to outline its own budget priorities and 15 related policy recommendations. A recent poll from EPIC-MRA showed that the League’s priorities are Michigan voters’ priorities, and resonate much more than “Keeping state and local income taxes low,” an important point with the state budget’s current revenue constraints.

“We don’t work in a vacuum and we know that calling for new investments in our current fiscal climate is bold. But our budget priorities are optimistic and aspirational—here are 15 things we think would better serve the people of Michigan than a tax cut,” Jacobs said.

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The Michigan League for Public Policy, www.mlpp.org, is a nonprofit policy institute focused on economic opportunity for all. It is the only state-level organization that addresses poverty in a comprehensive way.

U.S. House GOP health bill would end the Healthy Michigan Plan and leave 660,000 uninsured

For Immediate Release
June 7, 2017

Contact:
Alex Rossman
arossman@mlpp.org
517.487.5436

New reports reaffirm similar approach under consideration in Senate would shift massive costs to Michigan

LANSING—The Healthy Michigan Plan would effectively end and the 660,000 people who depend on it would lose coverage under the health bill passed by the U.S. House to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), according to a new report from the nonpartisan, Washington, DC-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. An additional report released by the Center today shows that delaying or phasing in the House bill’s massive cost shifts to states, as the Senate is reportedly considering, would have no effect on the ultimate outcome.

Michigan is one of eight states that have laws that effectively require their Medicaid expansions to end if federal financial support for the expansion falls. In these states, Medicaid expansion—and the Healthy Michigan Plan—would thus end in 2020 under the House Republicans’ American Health Care Act (AHCA).

The House bill would shift $582.5 million in costs to Michigan, which is more than the state spends on child welfare ($445M GF), early childhood programs ($258M SAF) and at-risk programs ($379M SAF) respectively. The $582.5 million strain on the state budget also is approximately more General Fund money than the state spends combined on the departments of Talent and Economic Development, Education, Military and Veterans Affairs, Agriculture and Rural Development, Environmental Quality, Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, Natural Resources, Civil Rights, Transportation and the Attorney General’s office.

Michigan would almost certainly be unable to absorb these additional costs, especially as more state General Fund money starts going to roads in the years ahead. As a result, Michigan would likely be forced to end its expansion and eliminate the Healthy Michigan Plan, leaving 660,000 adults with low incomes who have gained Medicaid coverage under the expansion at severe risk of becoming uninsured.

“Yesterday, I sat alongside the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Director and Budget Director, representatives from Michigan’s businesses, and doctors and hospital officials to talk about the success of the Healthy Michigan Plan and the importance of protecting it,” said Gilda Z. Jacobs, president and CEO of the Michigan League for Public Policy. “Yet here we are today with a new independent report showing how the U.S. House’s American Health Care Act will decimate the program and leave more than half a million state residents without coverage. Our state budget can’t afford these costs, and Healthy Michigan enrollees can’t afford to lose their coverage.”

As the U.S. Senate considers changes to the House GOP health bill, some have claimed that phasing the repeal out more slowly or delaying it by two years would avoid these harms. But neither of these proposals change the ultimate outcome: a huge cost-shift to states ending the Medicaid expansion and causing millions to lose coverage.

Other proponents of the House bill have suggested that people who would lose expansion coverage could instead purchase private coverage on their own using the House bill’s tax credits. That is false, the new reports show. Adults with low incomes would face unaffordable premiums if the expansion were repealed, even after taking the House bill’s tax credits into account. For example, premiums after tax credits for Michiganians in poverty would equal a whopping 48 percent of income for 60-year-olds at the federal poverty line. And that’s without taking into account provisions in the House bill that would let insurers go back to charging people with pre-existing conditions exorbitant premiums, stop covering critical services like mental health services and substance use treatment and imposing annual and lifetime limits.

“The American Health Care Act is a bad bill that will be disastrous for the Healthy Michigan Plan and the historic gains in health coverage and access to care that we have achieved under Medicaid expansion, and tinkering with it won’t solve its fundamental flaws,” Jacobs said. “Senators Debbie Stabenow and Gary Peters have been champions for Medicaid expansion and the rest of the Senate should follow suit and scrap the House bill and focus on bipartisan efforts to strengthen, not dramatically weaken, our healthcare system.”

The League is part of the Protect MI Care coalition, an organization of consumer, healthcare and insurer groups in the state who are working together to protect the ACA, the Healthy Michigan Plan and the care they provide. More information on the coalition is available at www.protectmicare.com.

To learn more, please visit:

House Republican Health Bill Would Effectively End ACA Medicaid Expansion
http://www.cbpp.org/research/health/house-republican-health-bill-would-effectively-end-aca-medicaid-expansion

People Losing Medicaid Under House Republican Bill Would Face High Barriers to Coverage
http://www.cbpp.org/research/health/people-losing-medicaid-under-house-republican-bill-would-face-high-barriers-to

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The Michigan League for Public Policy, www.mlpp.org, is a nonprofit policy institute focused on economic opportunity for all. It is the only state-level organization that addresses poverty in a comprehensive way.

Lawmakers pass healthcare bill that will hurt millions of Michigan residents

For Immediate Release
May 4, 2017

Contact:
Alex Rossman
arossman@mlpp.org
517-487-5436

LANSING—The Michigan League for Public Policy issued the following statement on the U.S. House Republicans’ passage of legislation today to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The statement may be attributed to League President & CEO Gilda Z. Jacobs.

“Today, congressional Republicans passed a healthcare plan that shows they don’t really care about health, and to add insult to injury, they did so with jubilation, not reservation. Instead of helping people, lawmakers voted today to eliminate insurance coverage for 24 million Americans, including the 650,000 Michigan residents who are covered through the Healthy Michigan Plan. They voted to end fair and affordable coverage for millions of people with pre-existing conditions, cut $800 billion in Medicaid funding, and eliminate nationwide bans on annual and lifetime limits.

“It’s particularly disheartening that it took making this bill worse to actually get it passed, but this fight is far from over—it’s just moving to a new venue. The League and our partners in Michigan and around the country will keep doing everything we can to protect healthcare coverage for residents who are struggling physically, mentally or financially. We hope that the Senate will be deliberative and put the real needs of Americans above the political rancor that has unfortunately dominated this debate.”

The League has been a strong advocate for the Affordable Care Act and the related Healthy Michigan Plan, and have opposed the U.S. House’s attempts to repeal it and change how Medicaid is funded. The League is also part of the Protect MI Care coalition, an organization of consumer, healthcare and insurer groups. More information is available at www.protectmicare.com.

Recent League Efforts on Healthcare:

March 16, 2017, Press Statement on AHCA: Major flaws exposed in U.S. House Republicans’ healthcare plan

Budget Brief: Protect Healthcare for 650,000 Michiganians

Fact Sheet: Medicaid Block Grants and Per Capita Caps Are Bad for Michigan’s Health

Fact Sheet: 10 Reasons the Affordable Care Act is Good for Michigan

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The Michigan League for Public Policy, www.mlpp.org, is a nonprofit policy institute focused on economic opportunity for all. It is the only state-level organization that addresses poverty in a comprehensive way.

New League report and online tool calculate how much it really costs to make ends meet in each county

For Immediate Release
May 3, 2017

Contact:
Alex Rossman
arossman@mlpp.org
517-487-5436

For 20 years, League has been publishing report to help policymakers understand true economic struggles of Michigan families

LANSING—It costs a Michigan family between $2,580 and $4,722 a month to pay for necessities and provide for themselves and their family according to Making Ends Meet in Michigan, a new report released by the Michigan League for Public Policy today. The monthly income necessary to make ends meet for a single parent with two kids is $3,943, and it costs a single worker $1,923 a month to get by.

The report analyzes and compiles state and county data on the costs of housing, food, child care, healthcare, transportation, and clothing and other household necessities along with likely taxes owed, to identify the Basic Needs Income Level. The Basic Needs Income Level is the amount of household income a family or individual must have to have in order to meet basic needs without public or private assistance. It’s what it really costs to live in a county.

An online calculator available at www.mlpp.org/calculator can be used to calculate the cost of living by county and family size. This report uniquely analyzes four different household sizes in each county—single, single parent, two parents/both working and two parents/one working. All families assume two children under age 5.

“For too long, policymakers have only used the poverty level and unemployment to assess how people in Michigan are doing, but there’s so much more to every Michigan family’s story and struggles than that,” said Gilda Z. Jacobs, president and CEO of the Michigan League for Public Policy. “This report seeks to draw attention to how much it really costs for families to make ends meet both statewide and in each county, and how our state’s current wages and services are not cutting it.”

The federal poverty threshold determines who is counted as officially poor but tells us little about whether a person or family is living in economic security. It does not reflect regional and local differences in the cost of living and is based on a model that, while adequate when first devised in 1965, is less reflective of today’s economic realities.

The Basic Needs Income Level calculated in this report is intended to help lawmakers and residents easily understand how much income a family needs in order to pay for all of its basic expenses. The Basic Needs Income Level can be used to measure the economic security of Michigan’s working families, assess the adequacy of worker wages and benefits, promote programs and policies that assist families in need, and as a benchmark by which to assess the quality of jobs being created in the state.

With this localized data on how much it really costs for families to make ends meet, the Michigan League for Public Policy’s report reframes the discussions around need, wage standards, public assistance and what it means to live in economic security. The League is focused on ensuring all Michigan residents have economic security because simply lifting people out of poverty is not enough. In addition to showing that the poverty level alone is not an adequate measure of stability, this data also shows that the state’s unemployment rate is not the only—or an adequate—benchmark for economic recovery.

“This data backs up what we’ve been saying the last few years as Michigan has ‘recovered’: the recovery is still not reaching everyone, many people are working in low-wage jobs and barely getting by, and the high costs of child care and healthcare are breaking people at all income levels,” Jacobs said. “There are a variety of policy changes lawmakers can make to help address this, including increasing the minimum wage, upholding healthcare and strengthening child care supports, passing a statewide earned sick leave law, and creating a fairer tax system that helps struggling workers as much as it does the wealthy.”

The League continues to connect the challenges facing Michigan kids and residents with the policy solutions to help them. To that end, Making Ends Meet outlines the following policy recommendations for lawmakers to better support their constituents:

  • Protect Michigan’s expansion of Medicaid and the federal Affordable Care Act as a whole;
  • Restore and strengthen the Michigan Earned Income Tax Credit;
  • Update Michigan’s child care subsidy;
  • Raise the minimum wage;
  • Invest in skills training and adult education.
  • Enact workplace protections such as earned sick leave and predictable scheduling; and
  • Create a more adequate tax system, including a graduated income tax.

In this report, housing costs are based on the Fair Market Rent (the 40th percentile of rents in each county) provided by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Food expenses are from the United States Department of Agriculture’s Low-Cost Food Plan. Child care costs are based on the 2015 Cost of Care Report from the Early Childhood Investment Corporation and healthcare expenses are calculated using the federal healthcare marketplace exchange. Finally, costs for clothing, household necessities, personal care and telephone come from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Survey and may vary depending on the family’s circumstances. Taxes are based on income and family size. For additional information, including data appendices and more details on how each of these expenses was calculated, go to www.mlpp.org/resources/making-ends-meet-in-michigan.

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The Michigan League for Public Policy, www.mlpp.org, is a nonprofit policy institute focused on economic opportunity for all. It is the only state-level organization that addresses poverty in a comprehensive way.

Kresge grant helps League redefine health policy work in Michigan and Detroit

For Immediate Release
March 31, 2017

Contact:
Alex Rossman
arossman@mlpp.org
517-487-5436

$600,000 grant funded two new health policy analyst positions, helps League improve integration of state health and human services

LANSING—A $600,000 grant from The Kresge Foundation awarded to the Michigan League for Public Policy will help transform the League’s health policy work in Detroit and around the state. The funding enabled the League to hire two new health policy analysts, one focusing on Medicaid and the other specializing in the social determinants of health.

“These policy analysts provide valuable expertise regarding additional opportunities to integrate health and human services policies that will lead to great health and well-being for Michiganders,” said David Fukuzawa, managing director for The Kresge Foundation’s health and human services programs. “The League will serve as a valuable resource for Michigan’s Department of Health and Human Services as the department continues to develop integrated services for the state.”

The funding from The Kresge Foundation will support the League’s research and analysis examining the current health and well-being of Detroiters and Michigan residents. The League will identify gaps in state services and support systems and create specific policy recommendations to address those gaps. This work by the League’s two new health policy analysts will advance public policy change by supporting the integration of health and human services and helping lawmakers, state department officials and service providers better understand the connection between health and other factors.

“The Kresge Foundation has been a longstanding supporter of our work at the League, but this significant grant will help take our health policy efforts to the next level,” said Gilda Z. Jacobs, president and CEO of the Michigan League for Public Policy. “We work on a variety of issues to improve the physical and economic well-being of kids and families in Detroit and around the state, and we are seeing more and more how all of these issues connect. A child’s health is directly impacted by their environment, nutrition and family’s income, and their health affects their education and future occupations and earnings. We need comprehensive strategies to tackle all of these issues, and this grant will enable us to do that.”

The League’s health policy analysts will research and write reports, analyze current and proposed policy, and work with partners, department staff and policymakers on social determinants of health and Medicaid-related issues. Emily Schwarzkopf, the League’s health policy analyst working on Medicaid, has hit the ground running as the League and our partners work to protect the Affordable Care Act and the state’s Medicaid expansion program, the Healthy Michigan Plan. Health Policy Analyst Julie Cassidy will be working on the social determinants of health, a relatively new focus of health policy work that takes a holistic approach and incorporates other needs and services.

The Kresge Foundation is a $3.6 billion private, national foundation that works to expand opportunities in America’s cities through grantmaking and social investing in arts and culture, education, environment, health, human services and community development in Detroit.

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The Michigan League for Public Policy, www.mlpp.org, is a nonprofit policy institute focused on economic opportunity for all. It is the only state-level organization that addresses poverty in a comprehensive way.

Major flaws exposed in U.S. House Republicans’ healthcare plan

For Immediate Release
March 16, 2017

Contact:
Alex Rossman
arossman@mlpp.org
517-487-5436

League, federal analysis show that plan will eliminate health coverage for 24 million people, cut $880 billion from Medicaid and shift costs to state

LANSING—Congressional Republicans’ plans for Medicaid funding will hobble Michigan’s budget and jeopardize healthcare for at least 2.5 million state residents according to a new fact sheet, Medicaid block grants and per capita caps are bad for Michigan’s health, released by the Michigan League for Public Policy today. This analysis comes on the heels of the Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) report this week that showed the House Republicans’ health plan to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will ultimately result in a drastic increase in the number of uninsured in the country and substantial cuts to federal Medicaid funding.

“The Affordable Care Act was a groundbreaking policy that significantly reduced the number of uninsured in Michigan and improved people’s health,” said Gilda Z. Jacobs, president and CEO of the Michigan League for Public Policy. “On the other hand, the House Republicans’ alternative plan is an absolute disaster. It will result in 24 million people losing health insurance, cut $880 billion from Medicaid, and stifle state Medicaid funding through per capita caps. The only people who will benefit from it are wealthy individuals who will get tax breaks while our residents, our small business owners and our hospitals all suffer.”

The CBO estimates that the House Republican health plan would cause 24 million people nationwide to lose insurance coverage by 2026, including 14 million people next year. The plan will slash federal Medicaid spending by $880 billion and gives $600 billion in tax cuts primarily to the wealthiest Americans while raising premiums for millions of consumers. Additional analysis on the plan is available from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

“The Affordable Care Act and the related Healthy Michigan Plan have been vital in reducing our state’s uninsured rate and have provided health coverage for millions of residents,” Jacobs said. “The governor supports the Healthy Michigan Plan and it was created with bipartisan support, but putting per capita caps on or block granting our state’s Medicaid funding will put this highly successful program at risk.”

The House Republicans’ current healthcare plan will put per capita caps on federal Medicaid funding for the states, giving Michigan and other states a fixed amount of money per Medicaid enrollee. Other Republican healthcare proposals have proposed distributing Medicaid funding through block grants where the federal government would send each state a specific amount of funding to support the entirety of the Medicaid program.

Using per capita caps or block grants to distribute federal Medicaid funding will limit the amount of federal funding that states receive, shifting costs and risk to states, hurting local economies, and putting quality coverage for seniors, people with disabilities and families with kids at risk. This shift could result in a significant financial strain on state budgets, forcing Michigan lawmakers to limit spending on Medicaid by reducing the number of people it covers or cutting other vital state programs including education, public safety or infrastructure.

The League has been a major supporter of the ACA since its inception, particularly the expansion of Medicaid through the Healthy Michigan Plan that currently insures 650,000 state residents with low incomes. The League put together a fact sheet on the ACA’s tangible benefits for Michigan residents, businesses, hospitals and our state economy.

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The Michigan League for Public Policy, www.mlpp.org, is a nonprofit policy institute focused on economic opportunity for all. It is the only state-level organization that addresses poverty in a comprehensive way.

Many bright spots in governor’s budget, but cloud of tax cut still looms

For Immediate Release
February 8, 2017

Contact:
Alex Rossman
arossman@mlpp.org
517-487-5436

Governor’s budget includes funding for many League priorities that support kids, workers and families

LANSING—The Michigan League for Public Policy issued the following statement on Governor Rick Snyder’s 2018 budget presented this morning. This statement can be attributed to Michigan League for Public Policy President & CEO Gilda Z. Jacobs.

“The governor’s budget today is very positive and includes money for many of the programs and services that help struggling workers and families. The League has been a champion for leveraging federal funds to support important state services, and the budget includes $6.8 million to draw down the federal money needed to keep the Heat and Eat program going and $8.4 million in state funds for child care to secure much-needed federal funding. The budget upholds continued funding for the Healthy Michigan Plan, which provides healthcare for more than 600,000 Michiganians with low incomes under the Affordable Care Act, and we appreciate Governor Snyder’s continued commitment to protecting that successful program in Michigan. (more…)

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