Healthy Michigan plan surpasses all expectations by first anniversary

The Healthy Michigan Plan, Michigan’s Medicaid expansion program, celebrates its first anniversary today. What an amazing year it has been for the program – with enrollment currently just over 600,000! The governor’s budget for 2015 estimated enrollment at 400,000 and 450,000 for budget year 2016. The budget released in February 2015 revised those estimates upward to 540,000 for 2015 and 580,000 for 2016. Those forecasts already have been surpassed – and it’s only April. (more…)

Cutting off Assistance to Families Won’t Improve School Attendance, Will Drive Up Poverty

Pushing families further into poverty will not increase school attendance rates. The Michigan Legislature is considering House Bill 4041 that would codify current Department of Human Services policy that terminates Family Independence Program, or cash assistance, for an entire family if a child between the ages of 6 and 15 is considered to be truant by their local school district. An entire family is punished for the actions of one child. If the student is 16 or older, only the truant child is removed from the case. The bill will not boost school attendance rates, but it will increase the number of children and families living in extreme poverty.

DHS policy should have the goal of helping families, not driving them deeper into economic crisis. The cash assistance program helps families living in extreme poverty (income under half of the poverty level, or $9,385 for a family of three). Families receiving FIP have very few resources and already face a number of challenges, including inconsistent work schedules; lack of access to quality, affordable child care; and reliable transportation. Eliminating their cash assistance will do nothing to address these challenges and will make life more difficult for their children. The League has the following concerns with HB 4041:

Codifying current DHS policy ties the hands of the department. It becomes much more difficult to change policy after it is made into law. The department would lose any flexibility to adapt its policy to better serve the needs of the people.

Barriers to attending school are not addressed. Four of the top 10 reasons for missing school, as identified by the Michigan School-Justice Partnership, deal with transportation, child care, and lack of appropriate clothing for the weather. Eliminating a family’s cash assistance will only make these issues worse. Working oneon-one with families to identify and resolve the underlying issues—without reducing their resources—is a much better route to ensure that a child is ready and able to learn at school. HB 4041 does not include any type of required intervention.

Lack of due process to appeal a decision. At times, an illness or other situation results in a high number of absences. These could be excused absences depending on the school attendance policy. Individual situations should be recognized, and families should have a clear process for appealing a decision that terminates their assistance. While DHS policy does include an appeals process, this proposed law does not.

Full-family sanction for families with children between 6 and 15 years old is severe. There may be cases in which a parent is doing everything in their power to get their 14year-old to school, but the child—for whatever reason—does not arrive or stay in school. Terminating assistance for the entire family for the actions of one child could make it more difficult for other children in the family to get to school.

Unclear definition of truancy or attendance policy. Without a statewide definition of truancy and the variances across school districts in how truancy is defined, there will be inequitable impact on children and families.

Child poverty remains unacceptably high. From 2006 to 2012, the rate of children living in poverty in Michigan grew by 35%. The economic recovery has not touched everyone. More than 70% of program participants are children with an average age of 7. Cutting off assistance will undoubtedly harm children in these families the most at a time when the governor’s dashboard calls for reducing childhood poverty.

House Bill 4041, and the related DHS policy, is not the way to improve attendance rates or the lives of these families in either the short or long run. Codifying this DHS policy will only contribute to increasing child poverty and the number of families living in extreme poverty.

 

An income tax cut won’t boost the economy

Cutting taxes won’t create jobs or grow the economy. Michigan is already facing budget cuts because there is not enough money to fund schools, public safety and other important services that we value. Reducing the income tax would create an even bigger hole in the budget, leading to more cuts and making it harder to create a strong workforce ready for the 21st century, according to a new fact sheet from the League. (more…)

Lopsided income growth hurts Michigan

The top 1% in Michigan earned 25 times the income of the bottom 99%, a new report from Economic Policy Institute concludes.

The report ranks Michigan as the 15th most unequal state in the country and offers new evidence on why Michigan policymakers should refuse more tax cuts so that they can invest in building the skills of a 21st century workforce.

In Michigan, inequality looks like this:

•    $942,993 a year on average for the top 1% of taxpayers.
•    $37,324 average annual income for the rest. (more…)

If there’s a will, there’s a way

A new video and visually engaging report out today strongly makes the case for rebuilding the state’s education system, protecting Michigan’s abundant natural resources and investing in roads and our communities.

The project is called The Michigan Dream at Risk, from the Michigan Economic Center, an affiliate of Prima Civitas, a nonprofit organization that works to create resilient, adaptable communities in Michigan.

Gilda Z. Jacobs, the League’s president and CEO, and board members Charley Ballard and Bob Kleine were interviewed for the project. (more…)

We’re 115 days late

Today is Michigan’s Equal Pay Day, marking how far into the 2014 calendar Michigan women must work in order to earn what men earned in 2013. (The National Equal Pay Day was April 8.)

States observe their own Equal Pay Day relative to the federal day based on how much their pay equity gap diverges from the gap nationwide. Michigan observes the day more than a week later because our state’s wage gap is the 7th widest in the nation. Michigan women earn 73.7 cents for every dollar that men earn, compared with 90.3 cents in the District of Columbia (and at the lowest end, 63.8 cents in Wyoming). (more…)

Rebuilding the Homestead Property Tax Credit

Gov. Rick Snyder wants to use some of the state’s budget “surplus” (higher-than-anticipated revenues) to restore a portion of the Homestead Property Tax Credit that was cut in 2011.

The governor reduced the HPTC starting in Tax Year 2012, eliminating the credit for 362,000 Michigan families. He now wants to restore the credit to about 100,000 of those families. (more…)

Raise Michigan raises hope

The possibility of a long-overdue increase to Michigan’s minimum wage is on the horizon with the kickoff of the Raise Michigan campaign to put the issue before voters on the fall ballot.

If successful, it will raise Michigan’s $7.40 an hour wage minimum wage to $10.10 over three years and index it to inflation. It also includes a gradual increase of the $2.65/hour “tipped” wage for restaurant servers.

With so many problems to report on – rising income inequality, growing number of low-income working moms and shrinking windows of opportunity for our young people – it’s good to be able to talk about a positive solution. (more…)

Data cheat sheet for census releases

This week, the U.S. Census Bureau will start releasing 2012 data from two of its largest surveys – the Current Population Survey and the American Community Survey.

While most people associate the Census Bureau only with the decennial census, it actually is responsible for dozens of surveys. In fact, the decennial census only gathers very basic information and primarily serves as a population count. (more…)

Is Michigan a place for economic opportunity?

An eye-opening map in the New York Times this week shows Michigan looking like a few Southern states when it comes to “income mobility’’ — a startling realization for the state that’s often credited with birthing the middle class.

If you are born in the Detroit or Kalamazoo area and your family income falls in the bottom fifth of income, your chances are very slim of moving to the top fifth, a new study concludes.

On the “heat map,” where red shows little mobility and blue shows the most mobility, Michigan and parts of Ohio and Indiana resemble Arkansas and Alabama. (more…)

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